Case Study: Bake-On Bacon simplifies cooking process and becomes a sought -after commercial kitchen companion

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The history

bakeonbacon_centre_r2_c5Since its early beginnings in Austria the Götzinger name has been synonymous with the production of the finest European smallgoods. For over 120 years the craft behind the production of these high-quality smallgoods has been handed down through generations, and is now the secret behind the success of the Yatala based Götzinger Smallgoods, owned and operated by Antony van der Drift.

The innovation

Seeking to simplify the process of preparing bacon for cooking, particularly in commercial establishments, Antony van der Drift invented a new packaged bacon product—one that would save time and money for busy chefs.
The packaged bacon product comes ready-arranged on a support sheet with the slices in a partly overlapping relationship. To place the bacon slices on a baking tray, only the support sheet needs to be handled, which can be done quickly and efficiently. As the bacon slices cook they shrink, and move from an overlapping to a side-by-side relationship with even cooking. Once the slices of bacon have been cooked, they can be lifted off the support sheet and placed on a serving dish. During cooking much of the oil and fat is captured by the support sheet, and when this is removed the cleaning of the baking tray is considerably eased.

The intellectual property protection requirement

The IP scenario involved the procurement of patent protection of the Bake-on Bacon product in Australia and New Zealand. Antony van der Drift filed a patent application for the product in Australia through Wayne Slater on September 9, 2004.

The IP scenario also involved developing a brand for this product and procuring registered trade mark protection for the brand. Antony selected Bake-on Bacon as his trade mark for this product and obtained registered trade mark for this product.

The product was released onto the market as Bake-on Bacon towards the end of 2004 and was an instant hit.

The outcome

The product has been hugely successful and has created a significant market for Gotzinger Smallgoods. Many hotels ordered the product for their commercial kitchens, with anecdotal evidence claiming that some chefs refused to work in a kitchen unless they could use Götzinger’s Bake-on Bacon product. This turned the use of Bake-on Bacon into a non-negotiable condition before a chef would agree to work.

After Götzinger’s established Bake-on Bacon in the marketplace, a competitor copied the product and solicited orders for the product with Götzinger’s existing customers. Götzinger worked with IP Gateway to institute proceedings against their competitor for patent infringement in the Federal Court and was successful in stopping the infringement. The product continues to be a major seller for Götzinger Smallgoods.

Bake-one Bacon has enjoyed major success, considerably easing a job of a chef working in a commercial kitchen, and is a great example of an innovation that provides a solution that directly addresses a market need. Bake-on Bacon also illustrates how an innovation can be fruitfully applied to a traditional industry where decades of craft and tradition are built into each product.

Commercial considerations aside, Antony van der Drift has undoubtedly earned the respect of many a hotel chef arriving at work at 4am to prepare breakfast for an army of hungry hotel guests.

Case Study: A molecular diagnostic system that allows safe collection, transportation and identification of infectious agents.

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The history

longhornTraditionally, the diagnoses of infectious diseases relied on the safe freezing and transportation of a sample to a laboratory where it underwent testing—a process known as culture based testing. However, there are obvious practical difficulties associated with providing suitable refrigeration and storage conditions, particularly in remote areas. For disease management, initial safe sample collection and cold chain transport conditions are crucial to the rapid and accurate diagnosis of diseases such as tuberculosis, HIV and influenza.

Molecular diagnostic testing soon began to appear as an alternative testing method, one which relies on preserving the integrity of the DNA/RNA sample and which addresses some of the disadvantages of culture based testing, namely the requirement for specimen freezing. With molecular diagnosis, a sample of DNA/RNA is obtained from a sample, transported to a laboratory and identified using PCR analysis.

The invention

Longhorn Vaccines & Diagnostics LLC, a private biotech company located in Bethesda, Maryland, USA.. developed a novel molecular diagnostic system that allows infectious agents to be safely collected, transported and accurately identified. The collection system, known as PrimeStore, inactivates microbes from clinical and environmental specimens and prevents nucleic acid degradation during shipping and storage. DNA/RNA is preserved at ambient temperature without the need for refrigeration or freezing. Longhorn further developed a pathogen specific detection system, known as PrimeMix, which is an all inclusive, one-step PCR reagent mix for point of collection detection. PrimeMix is also temperature stable, and can be field deployed.

The intellectual property protection requirement

IP Gateway provided a consolidated and proactive approach to prosecution of patent applications for the PrimeStore and PrimeMix technology before the Australian and New Zealand Patent Offices. Australian Patents have been granted, with the New Zealand patent applications proceeding to grant in the near future.

The outcome

IP Gateway is pleased to have been able to provide a proactive and consolidated approach to provide patent protection for an invention of this calibre, which has already demonstrated the potential to make a real difference in the treatment of infectious diseases. This can be witnessed with the Longhorn A/H1N1-09 Prime RRT-PCR Assay employed as the first collection to detection assay for the 2009 H1N1 Influenza virus (swine flu). In response to the public health emergency declared in 2010 by the US Secretary of Health and Human Services during the swine flu outbreak, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) authorised emergency use of the Longhorn Influenza A/H1N1-09 Prime RRT-PCR Assay to test for the presence of swine flu virus in clinical respiratory specimens.

Case Study: Queensland orthodontic appliance offers successful alternative to childhood braces

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The history

myobraceQueensland based Dr Christopher Farrell has been practising orthodontics since graduating in 1971. From the commencement of his career he has been interested in the causes of orthodontic and jaw (TMJ) problems, particularly in children. For many years, research had identified incorrect breathing and swallowing as the most dominant causes of myofunctional concerns. However, back in the early 1980s these research findings were not taken up by the majority of the Dental and Medical profession. As a result, Dr Farrell decided to apply his time to the focused design and creation of innovative orthodontic appliances. In 1989 he founded the Myofunctional Research Co.

The innovation

bracesOne of the key innovations made by Dr Farrell involved the development of a new appliance under the MYOBRACE brand. The MYOBRACE orthodontic appliance demonstrates great efficacy at expanding the upper arch in the mouth region of a developing child to match the lower arch and aligns the teeth on the upper arch.

The intellectual property protection

The MYOBRACE orthodontic appliance was protected by patent applications and these have resulted in issued patents in over 20 countries around the world.

In addition, Dr Farrell sought a strong and distinctive trade mark for this important product. He also wanted a trade mark that suggested the different course he was charting in relation to orthodontics. Dr Farrell coined the term MYOBRACE and developed a distinctive MYOBRACE logo which is striking and contains artwork suggesting a row of teeth.

The MYOBRACE and MYOBRACE logo trade marks were protected in Australia initially, and then protection was extended into major overseas markets. The registration of this trade mark proceeded smoothly. The trade mark was considered to be quite different to prior trade mark applications in the orthodontic field. The MYOBRACE trade mark, once a newly coined word, has now been successfully registered in over 20 countries, around the world.

The outcome

The MYOBRACE orthodontic appliance has been used to successfully treat thousands of children around the world. One obvious benefit of the MYOBRACE appliance is that there are no railway tracks, no bands, and no wires in the patient’s mouth. Another major benefit is that the appliance is injection moulded and can be produced on a large scale. This makes the treatment more affordable and opens up the treatment to a wide market in developing countries.

The MYOBRACE brand has strengthened over time, and has become synonymous with Dr Farrell’s ground breaking appliances. Simply put, it has become a market leader in the treatment of children’s teeth without using wire braces. The MYOBRACE trade mark occupies a central and leading position in the ongoing development of Dr Farrell’s business, and its legacy can be summed up by the slogan: ‘Better Faces/Less Braces’.

IP Gateway has developed a personally rewarding relationship with Dr Farrell, and has enjoyed seeing his trade mark grow into a formidable international brand.

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